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Please Educate Yourself On Wild Animals

September 3, 2013

To The Reader’s Forum: I keep hearing of people shooting foxes, raccoons and other small animals for no reason at all....

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(20)

50s4ever

Sep-07-13 5:56 AM

I knew it. yap is an expert on mange. What a resume.

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Gemni5

Sep-05-13 6:19 PM

Eek....Ebola is lurking in Chautauqua County...better kill the fox with mange!

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-04-13 12:55 PM

Also, sonoma creates the perception that mange is a deadly disease. It is not. It can cause distress but making judgments when not an expert is not advocated.

"Killing an animal with mange is the most humane thing you could do as it normally only gets worse and the animal will suffer for weeks before dying."

No, leaving an animal alone with mange is more humane. Mange is a skin disorder; all it does is cause itching. It is akin to scabies in humans. The animals come out in the day with mange because it is annoying.

This misinformation about both mange and rabies is unfortunate.

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-04-13 11:18 AM

I like how sonoma shunned copying and pasting and then...copied and pasted. Crackheads.

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sonoma

Sep-04-13 6:57 AM

"But the pool of all viruses in wildlife, including many potential threats to humans, is actually much deeper,"

I am done on this topic. Bottom line is use caution when wild animals show no fear of you or are seen in areas or time frames not normal to their species.

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sonoma

Sep-04-13 6:54 AM

It's not all about rabies. It's about how to act around animals, especially ones showing signs of stress.

From West Nile and Ebola to SARS and HIV, most of the emerging infectious diseases that plague humans today originated in other animals. According to a new estimate, there are at least 320,000 viruses in mammals alone, the vast majority of them awaiting discovery.

Scientists say that collecting data on pathogens that may lurk in wildlife before they jump to humans could help officials detect and stem future outbreaks.

"What we currently know about viruses is very much biased towards those that have already spilled over into humans or animals and emerged as diseases," study author Simon Anthony of the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health said in a statement. [10 Deadly Diseases That Hopped Across Species]

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-03-13 8:31 PM

"BTW---I don't have to copy and paste what others have to say on the subject."

Strangest thing I've read on here in a while. Believe it or not. Guess facts are officially shunned.

"I have lots of practical experience on the habits and lives of wild animals."

100% chance you've never dealt with rabies. I have no practical experience, so I rely on experts. I don't pretend to be one.

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Gemni5

Sep-03-13 6:37 PM

Copying and pasting is a good way to combat people who question what you are saying...doesn't mean they don't have personal experience....they are just backing up their experience with a written authority. Good form, isay!

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sonoma

Sep-03-13 5:50 PM

Perhaps you folks should go back and read everything I wrote and not try to add something that isn't there just to fight. Most of my original comments pertained to mange which is what most sickly animals seen in the summer have. BTW---I don't have to copy and paste what others have to say on the subject. I have lots of practical experience on the habits and lives of wild animals. I have also done the humane thing and then properly disposed of sickly wild animals. There is no drug store in the wild.

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Debbie

Sep-03-13 3:58 PM

Go to wildlifehotline**** or the DEC website & read. Yes nocturnal come out to eat during the day. This does NOT mean the have rabies. So sonoma, you should go read up on this.

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-03-13 1:19 PM

"People who contracted rabies in the United States were mostly infected by a bat. Most didn’t even know they were bitten. Some may have been sleeping when bitten. Others handled a bat bare-handed without realizing they’d been potentially exposed to rabies. But don’t panic over every bat sighting. Less than one-half of one percent of all bats in North America carries rabies.

Although rac***** suffer from rabies more than any other mammal in the United States (about 35 percent of all animal rabies cases), only one human death from the raccoon strain of rabies has been recorded in the United States."

From Humane Society web site.

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-03-13 1:18 PM

Also, only ONE to TWO humans in the US die from rabies a year. Probably the equivalent of being killed by a falling satellite.

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-03-13 1:16 PM

"This does not include, however, the greatly increasing rate of prophylactic rabies treatments in cases of possible exposure, which numbered fewer than one hundred humans annually in the state of New York before 1990, for instance, but rose to approximately ten thousand annually between 1990 and 1995. At approximately $1,500 per course of treatment, this represents a considerable public health expenditure."

Unfortunately, the fear-spreading about rabies costs the US annually as well.

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-03-13 1:12 PM

Fox are such small carriers they are barely noted. The VAST majority of rabies nationwide is attributed to the three.

The near-eradication of rabies in tdomestic animals has been the solution. Very few people contract rabies; the deaths are averted on account of the human vaccine but the domestic reduction due to the vaccine is by far the reason. Once again, rabies is nearly impossible to contract this day and age. More people die from falling off cruise ships I'd bet.

In a nation such as India, for example, feral and stray dogs are the biggest carrier.

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duckster

Sep-03-13 12:21 PM

I see Foxes out in the day all this time.. They are ok.. I also like cats... dead ones

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sonoma

Sep-03-13 11:14 AM

You noted the first three critters most likely to have rabies. Fox are #4 nationwide. There are very few human deaths because folks who get bit normally take a series of shots which will cure it in humans. There are approx 500 confirmed cases of animal rabies in NY each year which means the animal actually was turned into the authorities and tested. You are much more likely to see a animal with Mange than rabies. I have seen 1 fox with rabies and over 2 dozen (mostly fox) with mange over the years. Yes, I too have seen some healthy critters in my fields in mid day. I have seen "ALL" the sick critters in my yard or fields in midday.

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50s4ever

Sep-03-13 10:57 AM

Ya gotta love that filter...let's try...cracker....peckerwood....*******...*****..

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ironyoozesfromyouryap

Sep-03-13 9:54 AM

THANK YOU. TOO MANY misconceptions about rabies.

Foxes DO NOT carry rabies in the wild of any significance. The biggest carriers in the northeast and east are Raccoon, bat, and skunk. Rac*****, when contracting rabies, usually die within 1-2 days. That is why they are carriers yet nobody gets infected from rac*****. This hysterical approach to rabies is largely unfounded. I believe last year in the whole USA less than a dozen people died from rabies. Brain eating amoeba is just as easily contracted.

Treating animals like this out in daylight should be like treating people you see out at night. Oh, you see someone out at 2 am? Must be they have a disease!

All the public and private sources with regards to animal behavior will say that these animals are commonly found during the day. It is not according to their nature but is NOT ABNORMAL. It doesn't prove anything about their condition. Momma fox or raccoon might be getting food for her litter.

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thetruthreallyis

Sep-03-13 8:12 AM

my dear reader friends, please understand that fox and coyotes ARE indeed out during the day!! we watch a coyote cross our hay field at least three times a week during the day. yes, it is a coyote. When we are haying we will often times stop to watch a fox romping through the windrows of hay or we have watched litters of fox pups playing on our fields!! Lets all try our best to be educated about wildlife!! God gave us these creatures to do their part on earth also!! If you are concerned about a rabid animal, PLEASE call the authorities!! The DEC is always willing to help out!! Thank you!!

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sonoma

Sep-03-13 7:16 AM

I suggest the writer educate herself on the habits of wildlife before giving incorrect information to the public. Fox, raccoon, coyotes, etc normally are not out in the open during the mid-day hours and any seen should be viewed with suspicion. As stated, they may not have rabies but more likely mange at this time of year. Killing an animal with mange is the most humane thing you could do as it normally only gets worse and the animal will suffer for weeks before dying. Be sure to bury the animal deep enough that no other animal can dig it up and become infected. Contrary to the claims of the children's books on animals every day is a fight for survival for them and mange, distemper, and rabies are a fact of life for them. Do not attempt to approach any wild animal. If it lets you get close there is something wrong and you have potentially put yourself in harms way.

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